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Clothing...

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Clothing...

Bit new to this cycling thing, and even newer to cycle touring...! I'm planning on cycling from Cheltenham (UK) to Palombaro (Italy) next May to "celebrate" my 40th birthday.

I am just wondering what people actually wear when touring on their bikes? I've got several cycling jerseys that I wear when out on my road bike but looking at various pictures and website there don't seem to be many people wearing these garish colourful items...

Sorry if this is a bit basic and probably been discussed elsewhere but I'll hopefully be back with more challenging questions as my training and requirements progress...

Unregistered anon_user's picture
Clothing

Garish is good, drivers can see you.

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Merino wool is king...

Merino wool is king...

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For me Merino's wool is not

For me Merino's wool is not so good because it's too long to dry. I prefer Helly Hansen dry suit like this one.
https://www.amazon.fr/Helly-Hansen-Sous-v%C3%AAtement-technique-homme/dp/B00283L76I/ref=sr_1_21/255-1058721-3220800?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1478030745&sr=1-21
I use it for everything, cycling, sailing, kayaking, climbing, running... It dries in a few minute and stay warm when it's wet.

WS Member WS Member's picture
You can wear pretty much

You can wear pretty much whatever you want on the bike. I've seen tourers in everything from lycra to rustic dresses. Lycra does look a bit silly, though, because touring is not a race – you don’t need to be highly aerodynamic to do your 70–120 km/day (the panniers bulging from your bike would undo any aerodynamic benefits anyway).

I agree that your basic shirt should be merino wool. I usually wear Smartwool's Micro 150 crew shirt, which breathes so amazingly well and is comfortable to wear even at 30℃. As for trousers and shirts over that base layer, I generally tend to wear the same clothing I wear when I'm hitchhiking or trekking, namely rugged outdoor gear that will hold up over long trips. I generally prefer the Fjällräven brand. I've worn a pair of their zip-off trousers as my main riding shorts for over 10,000 km and they are still in one piece and looking quite good (albeit a bit faded from UV). Also, Fjällräven's G-1000 fabric can be waxed to be water-repellent, and I find it's enough to wax just the shoulders and part of the back of their shirts when I'm on the bike, as in a hunched-over riding position rain will generally hit only those areas, while the rest of the garment can stay unwaxed for good breathability.

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long sleeves

Hi,

Whatever you want to wear, but.... I would recommend, shirt LONG SLEEVES (cotton with pockets etc. (kind of office shirt )) to protect you from the sun ! And you don't have to put sunscreen on your arms.
I also often wear, a cycling short and long pants, or just over the knee, also to protect my legs agains the sun
And..... last but not least, the very silly long socks, and sometimes leg warmers. if warm, just put them down, if getting colder just pull them up.

Ciao Karin

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I am speaking from a hosting

I am speaking from a hosting point of view. It seems like almost everyone who comes here has some sort of a basic man's shirt - often plaid or light denim/chambray. They seem to wear it over tighter clothing and put it on and off as needed. Again, am simply observing!

As a car driver, the cyclists who have a reflective vest or at least very bright colours on are much easier to see from a distance. You can buy reflective tape to sew onto clothing. Even a little bit helps if you are wearing something dark.

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I try to buy gear which can

I try to buy gear which can be worn off the bike as well so you look like a local rather than a gaudy clothed cyclist. I don't want to wear a brightly coloured top covered with sponsors names when off the bike. Quick drying tops (synthetics) and merino long sleeved tops for warmth, mountainbike baggy shorts with removable chamois liner. Arm and leg warmers for colder days. Cotton shirt for very sunny days. My yellow panniers keep me visible on the road so I don't go for bright fluorescent colours.

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Clothing

Biking shorts (a friend says it's the most important part of the bike) and sunblock clothing, shirts and zip off pants meant for hiking. We especially like UPF men's shirts, loose fitting light colored ones. They are very cool, dry quickly and keep you from roasting in the sun and getting devoured by insects. If you have a green reflective bike vest you're visible but you can wear normal colored clothes underneath. Synthetic underpants for fast drying are good, though in real life I prefer cotton.
A very light down vest is excellent instead of a sweater because it doubles as a pillow, so you won't feel you've taken too much even if it is too warm to wear. Biking ponchos are hard to find but invaluable, plus a light weight rain jacket that can double as a wind breaker.

WS Member WS Member's picture
Clothing

Biking shorts (a friend says it's the most important part of the bike) and sunblock clothing, shirts and zip off pants meant for hiking. We especially like UPF men's shirts, loose fitting light colored ones. They are very cool, dry quickly and keep you from roasting in the sun and getting devoured by insects. If you have a green reflective bike vest you're visible but you can wear normal colored clothes underneath. Synthetic underpants for fast drying are good, though in real life I prefer cotton.
A very light down vest is excellent instead of a sweater because it doubles as a pillow, so you won't feel you've taken too much even if it is too warm to wear. Biking ponchos are hard to find but invaluable, plus a light weight rain jacket that can double as a wind breaker.

Unregistered anon_user's picture
in hiking there is a saying .

in hiking there is a saying ... cotton kills. In cycling I avoid cotton and also polyester, as it tends to stink. That leaves me with wool, and wool blends. I favor regular dark tones ... I don't care for all those garish neon colors that some favor. Wool helps me stay warm and it is much better at odor control, which is important to me as I do a lot of stealth-camping and only get a shower infrequently. :)

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