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Bear!!

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Bear!!

Hello Everyone!

I am planning to start my ride from Anchorage, Ak to Toronto, Canada during this summer. I will be on a tandem. I am keen to learn about Bear attacks on cyclist and what to do in any situation.

Any suggestion will be helpful.

Thanks
Muntasir
www.trashmaniac.com/v2

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Midnight snack?

I came on here researching exactly your question.
I will go through bear country (Canada), starting in July and this is the only variable that I have no experience with.

Clarification: Thanks to all the nice comments on here. Yes, I have done my research as well and read many of the suggested websites already.

The scenario that goes through my head is something like this: On my trip I will often be off the beaten path, most likely dropping dead off the saddle at the end of a 150-200 km day (if I get that lucky tail wind I am hoping for ;) ). All by myself (only surrounded by mosquitoes) I will remotely put up my tiny tent, secure my food items by hanging them off a tree... and offer myself up for a midnight hungry bear snack???
I will be a sleeping duck in my tiny tent and the bear spray will just add a little extra delicious spice while I am neatly wrapped up in my sleeping bag, rain fly, footprint and mosquito netting during that hungry bear attack?
Not sure if my light weight tent stakes will offer much of a counter attack tool?

The karmic tragic is that I'd rather deserve to be shark food due to the amount of Sushi I consumed in my life; so how can I make sure I survive a midnight bear encounter when/where no one can hear me scream?

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Bear country

I'm from bear country....Canada �. While bears are prevalent here, they are not found everywhere. To be honest, I've only seen a few black bears in my life and I grew up in the woods. Black bears aren't aggressive. It's the Grizzlies that you really want to pay attention to. Again, they are rare. But there is some great info on this parks BC website: http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks/explore/misc/bears/bearsaf.html. Keep in mind, if you get bear spray, and you should, you need to be within an arms length or so of the bear to spray it right in their face.

If you are camping in campsites, there will be bear and wolf caches to store your food in. Otherwise, you will want to suspend your food in a tree.
Hope this helps!

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Bears want your food not you

Lol! I love that scenario! Honestly, my partner is from bear country and hiked all over. You've got nothing to worry about as long as you're not keeping things that smell good to a bear in your tent. They don't like smelly cyclists;)

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Beas are dangerous

Bears are fucking dangerous! I would recommend a big can of pepper spray. [from wikipedia]:

....Some exceptional polar bears and Kodiak bears (a brown bear subspecies) have been weighed at over 750 kg (1,650 lb). .....Adult male Kodiak bears average 480 to 533 kg (1,058 to 1,175 lb) compared to an average of 386 to 408 kg (851 to 899 lb) in adult male polar bears, per the Guinness Book of World Records.[26] .....

....They are still quite fast, with the brown bear reaching 48 km/h (30 mph)......Bears' nonretractable claws are used for digging, climbing, tearing, and catching prey....

.......Bears have an excellent sense of smell, better than the dogs (Canidae), or possibly any other mammal. This sense of smell is used for signalling between bears (either to warn off rivals or detect mates) and for finding food. Smell is the principal sense used by bears to find most of their food....

....The tiger is the only predator known to regularly prey on adult bears....

....Some species, such as the polar bear, American black bear, grizzly bear, sloth bear, and brown bear, are dangerous to humans, especially in areas where they have become used to people. All bears are physically powerful and are likely capable of fatally attacking a person, but they, for the most part, are shy, are easily frightened and will avoid humans.....

In conclusion you need a tiger or an automatic rifle!

On the serious you will probably do your own research on many available links like http://www.mountainnature.com/wildlife/bears/bearencounters.htm but I would be very careful with my path and garbage and keep a can of pepper spray on the bike ready to be used.

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Thanks man! I have safely

Thanks man! I have safely rode across Canada and still alive! Have seen bears few times but i was ok.

Thanks
Muntasir

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